Database Development Life Cycle Paper

Database Development Life Cycle Paper 

Database Development Life Cycle Paper

Prior to beginning work on this assignment read Chapters 1, 2, and 9 of your textbook, review the Database Lifecycle (Links to an external site.) and (DBLC) Database Life Cycle (Links to an external site.) online resources, and review any relevant information in this week’s lecture. These sources will be used to support your work in the assignment. It is also recommended that you log in to your virtual lab environment and make sure you can access the Structured Query Language (SQL) server housed there.

Successful database development must appropriately reflect the information system of which the database is a part. In order to ensure that the database captures the needed information for the target information system, database architects must work within a framework known as the Database Development Life Cycle (DBLC). The DBLC includes steps ranging from initial assessment and analysis to operation and maintenance. This assignment will be the first step in the creation of your Week Six Database Design Project.

For this assignment, analyze the user needs laid out in the ISM641 DBLC Scenario download in order to facilitate the development of a database life cycle for the project. Within your paper describe the steps of the Database Development Life Cycle as it relates to the ConstructCo needs. Explain the analysis, design, implementation and testing tasks needed to complete each step within the DBLC for ConstructCo. For the conceptual design phase of the development, describe how unstructured data can be converted to structured data. Explain a minimum of two challenges, either business or technical, you might face when implementing the DBLC process and suggest ways in which you would overcome these challenges. Use evidence from your required resources to support your statements.

The final portion of your paper will be a one-page professional memo that will explain the DBLC steps to the ConstructCo executive team. The objective of the memo is to gain buy-in for the database development process in order to ensure successful project implementation. (Information on Writing a Business Memo, Business Memo Template, and a Sample Business Memo, are provided for your convenience.)

  • Must be two to three double-spaced pages in length (not including title and references pages) and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center (Links to an external site.).
  • Must include a separate title page with the following:
    • Title of paper
    • Student’s name
    • Course name and number
    • Instructor’s name
    • Date submitted
  • Must use at least two professional sources in addition to the course text.
  • Must document all sources in APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
  • Must include a separate references page that is formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.

Carefully review the Grading Rubric (Links to an external site.) for the criteria that will be used to evaluate your assignment.

Explanation & Answer length: 2 pages6 attachmentsSlide 1 of 6

UNFORMATTED ATTACHMENT PREVIEW

Database Lifecycle This article follows on from Database Design: Overview. Like everything else, databases have a finite lifespan. They are born in a flush of optimism and make their way through life achieving fame, fortune, and peaceful anonymity, or notoriety as the case may be, before fading out once more. Even the most successful database at some time is replaced by another, more flexible and up-to-date structure, and so begins life anew. Although exact definitions differ, there are generally six stages of the database lifecycle. Analysis The analysis phase is where the stakeholders are interviewed and any existing system is examined to identify problems, possibilities and constraints. The objectives and scope of the new system are determined. Design The design phase is where a conceptual design is created from the previously determined requirements, and a logical and physical design are created that will ready the database for implementation. Implementation The implementation phase is where the database management system (DBMS) is installed, the databases are created, and the data are loaded or imported. Testing The testing phase is where the database is tested and fine-tuned, usually in conjunction with the associated applications. Operation The operation phase is where the database is working normally, producing information for its users. Maintenance The maintenance phase is where changes are made to the database in response to new requirements or changed operating conditions (such as heavier load). Database development is not independent of systems development, often being one component of the greater systems development process. The stages of systems development basically mirror the stages of a database lifecycle but are a superset. Whereas database design deals with designing the system to store the data, systems design is also concerned with the processes that will impact on the data. (DBLC) Database Life Cycle The database life cycle (DBLC) defines the stages involved for implementing a database, starting with requirements analysis and ending with monitoring and modification. Furthermore, the DBLC never ends because database monitoring, modification, and maintenance are part of the life cycle, and these activities continue long after a database has been implemented. Put simply, the DBLC encompasses the lifetime of the database. The five stages in the database life cycle are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Requirements analysis Logical design Physical design Implementation Monitoring, modification, and maintenance 1. Requirements analysis 2. Logical Design 3. Physical Design 4. Implementation 5. Monitoring and Modification The first three stages (1. Requirements analysis 2. Logical Design 3. Physical Design) are database-design stages, which are listed below the diagram shown above. Database Design for Mere Mortals I. Requirements analysis Requirements Analysis is the first and most important stage in the Database Life Cycle. It is the most labor-intensive for the database designer. This stage involves assessing the informational needs of an organization so that a database can be designed to meet those needs. II. Logical design During the first part of Logical Design, a conceptual model is created based on the needs assessment performed in stage one. A conceptual model is typically an entity-relationship (ER) diagram that shows the tables, fields, and primary keys of the database, and how tables are related (linked) to one another. The tables sketched in the ER diagram are then normalized. The normalization process resolves any problems associated with the database design, so that data can be accessed quickly and efficiently. 1

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Database Development Life Cycle Paper

Database Development Life Cycle Paper

Prior to beginning work on this assignment read Chapters 1, 2, and 9 of your textbook, review the Database Lifecycle (Links to an external site.) and (DBLC) Database Life Cycle (Links to an external site.) online resources, and review any relevant information in this week’s lecture. These sources will be used to support your work in the assignment. It is also recommended that you log in to your virtual lab environment and make sure you can access the Structured Query Language (SQL) server housed there.

Successful database development must appropriately reflect the information system of which the database is a part. In order to ensure that the database captures the needed information for the target information system, database architects must work within a framework known as the Database Development Life Cycle (DBLC). The DBLC includes steps ranging from initial assessment and analysis to operation and maintenance. This assignment will be the first step in the creation of your Week Six Database Design Project.

For this assignment, analyze the user needs laid out in the ISM641 DBLC Scenario download in order to facilitate the development of a database life cycle for the project. Within your paper describe the steps of the Database Development Life Cycle as it relates to the ConstructCo needs. Explain the analysis, design, implementation and testing tasks needed to complete each step within the DBLC for ConstructCo. For the conceptual design phase of the development, describe how unstructured data can be converted to structured data. Explain a minimum of two challenges, either business or technical, you might face when implementing the DBLC process and suggest ways in which you would overcome these challenges. Use evidence from your required resources to support your statements.

The final portion of your paper will be a one-page professional memo that will explain the DBLC steps to the ConstructCo executive team. The objective of the memo is to gain buy-in for the database development process in order to ensure successful project implementation. (Information on Writing a Business Memo, Business Memo Template, and a Sample Business Memo, are provided for your convenience.)

  • Must be two to three double-spaced pages in length (not including title and references pages) and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center (Links to an external site.).
  • Must include a separate title page with the following:
    • Title of paper
    • Student’s name
    • Course name and number
    • Instructor’s name
    • Date submitted
  • Must use at least two professional sources in addition to the course text.
  • Must document all sources in APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
  • Must include a separate references page that is formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.

Carefully review the Grading Rubric (Links to an external site.) for the criteria that will be used to evaluate your assignment.

Explanation & Answer length: 2 pages6 attachmentsSlide 1 of 6

UNFORMATTED ATTACHMENT PREVIEW

Database Lifecycle This article follows on from Database Design: Overview. Like everything else, databases have a finite lifespan. They are born in a flush of optimism and make their way through life achieving fame, fortune, and peaceful anonymity, or notoriety as the case may be, before fading out once more. Even the most successful database at some time is replaced by another, more flexible and up-to-date structure, and so begins life anew. Although exact definitions differ, there are generally six stages of the database lifecycle. Analysis The analysis phase is where the stakeholders are interviewed and any existing system is examined to identify problems, possibilities and constraints. The objectives and scope of the new system are determined. Design The design phase is where a conceptual design is created from the previously determined requirements, and a logical and physical design are created that will ready the database for implementation. Implementation The implementation phase is where the database management system (DBMS) is installed, the databases are created, and the data are loaded or imported. Testing The testing phase is where the database is tested and fine-tuned, usually in conjunction with the associated applications. Operation The operation phase is where the database is working normally, producing information for its users. Maintenance The maintenance phase is where changes are made to the database in response to new requirements or changed operating conditions (such as heavier load). Database development is not independent of systems development, often being one component of the greater systems development process. The stages of systems development basically mirror the stages of a database lifecycle but are a superset. Whereas database design deals with designing the system to store the data, systems design is also concerned with the processes that will impact on the data. (DBLC) Database Life Cycle The database life cycle (DBLC) defines the stages involved for implementing a database, starting with requirements analysis and ending with monitoring and modification. Furthermore, the DBLC never ends because database monitoring, modification, and maintenance are part of the life cycle, and these activities continue long after a database has been implemented. Put simply, the DBLC encompasses the lifetime of the database. The five stages in the database life cycle are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Requirements analysis Logical design Physical design Implementation Monitoring, modification, and maintenance 1. Requirements analysis 2. Logical Design 3. Physical Design 4. Implementation 5. Monitoring and Modification The first three stages (1. Requirements analysis 2. Logical Design 3. Physical Design) are database-design stages, which are listed below the diagram shown above. Database Design for Mere Mortals I. Requirements analysis Requirements Analysis is the first and most important stage in the Database Life Cycle. It is the most labor-intensive for the database designer. This stage involves assessing the informational needs of an organization so that a database can be designed to meet those needs. II. Logical design During the first part of Logical Design, a conceptual model is created based on the needs assessment performed in stage one. A conceptual model is typically an entity-relationship (ER) diagram that shows the tables, fields, and primary keys of the database, and how tables are related (linked) to one another. The tables sketched in the ER diagram are then normalized. The normalization process resolves any problems associated with the database design, so that data can be accessed quickly and efficiently. 1

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Database Development Life Cycle Paper